.Since June 1 began hurricane season here in Florida, we thought it would be a good idea to share some information regarding preparations for either a hurricane or a tropical storm.

You can’t stop a tropical storm or hurricane, but you can take steps now to protect you and your family.

If you live in areas at risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages you to begin preparing for hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 each year.

Please follow these important hurricane preparedness tips from CDC:

  1. Preparing for a hurricane:  Take basic steps now to ensure your safety should a storm hit.  Discuss the plan with family members so everyone is aware of what to do in an emergency.
  2. Emergency supplies you will need:  Stock your home and car with supplies.  Food should be non-perishable.  Gasoline may be in short supply, so when a storm nears, make sure your tank is full.
  3. Make a plan:  Create a family disaster plan.  Include a phone number that all family members can call to check in after the storm passes.
  4. Avoid flooded areas:  Take precautions before, during, and after a flood.  Storm surge can quickly flood low lying areas and water depth can be misleading.
  5. Prepare to evacuate:  NEVER ignore an evacuation order, especially if you are in a flood zone.  Where to evacuate should be part of your preparation plan so you won’t be scrambling at the last minute trying to decide where to go.  Make reservations in advance if you plan to go to a hotel/motel, as they quickly fill up during an evacuation order.
  6. Protecting older adults:  Understand older adult health and medical concerns, as well as making sure you have a supply of medications on hand.  If you are planning to go to a local shelter, you most likely will need to pre-register to ensure you are able to obtain a space.  Most shelters have special rooms designated for the special needs adults.
  7. Protect pets:  Make sure of your pet’s safety before, during, and after an emergency.  If you are evacuating to either a local shelter or to a hotel/motel, make sure ahead of time that pets are accepted.  Local shelters will require you to provide shot records and pre-registration.
  8. Prevent carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning after the storm:  Ensure your CO detector has working batteries.  Place generators outside at least 20 feet from any door, window, or vent.  Make sure you have ample fuel for your generator on hand as gasoline may be in short supply before, during, and after the storm.
  9. After a hurricane:  Learn how to avoid injuries, make sure your food and water are safe, and be sure to clean up any mold safely.  Broken glass and live electrical wires are common after a hurricane, so be sure you use caution when you are out walking and when walking your pets.

CDC strongly recommends that you print all important resources before a hurricane strikes. Power outages during and after a hurricane can prevent you from accessing information online when you most need it. Preparing now can help keep you and your family safe.